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Opinion: Watch Your Mouth

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Opinion: Watch Your Mouth

Student holds hands over her mouth to show she is in fact being cautious of what she says.

Student holds hands over her mouth to show she is in fact being cautious of what she says.

Mariah Clemow

Student holds hands over her mouth to show she is in fact being cautious of what she says.

Mariah Clemow

Mariah Clemow

Student holds hands over her mouth to show she is in fact being cautious of what she says.

Mariah Clemow, Staff Writer and Editor

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Cursing has become a norm in today’s society. It is a trend that continues to increase but should it? I think it is a trend that needs to fade as quickly as possible. 

Walking down the halls, some may hear the words of profanity. It is very common to hear a couple of curse words here and there but it shouldn’t be something you just hear in passing. It should not be a social norm.

Cursing doesn’t just affect the person saying it; it makes the people around them feel uncomfortable.

Senior Courtney Schneider said, “I think cursing is not only disrespectful to those around you at school but also to yourself. It’s a matter of respect, if you respect the ones around you and if you respect yourself.”

The magazine, Elle, wrote an article analyzing cursing and the effects of it on individuals and on society. Writer, Monica Corcoran Horan reported,  “in a recent University of Arizona study, piggybacking on Stephens’ theory about swearing and pain, raised the matter of the social cost of cursing.” It went on to show that people who cursed to loved ones didn’t have as much support by the end of the day because of the negative impact.

Not only can cursing can make people feel uncomfortable but it can also unknowingly offend them. It is about respect and not crossing a line in public or professional settings. Knowing when too much is too much is a key factor in remaining respectful.

“Cussing can go against others’ beliefs, but it may also lead you to be more upset over a situation and take it out of hand and make it even worse,” said Schneider.

Reducing the amount of curse words you say could be good, but I mainly want to say you do you. If you feel cursing makes you look cool or you have no other way to express yourself then great, go ahead. But watch the scene you are in, who is around you, how loud you may be speaking. It Is a valued skill to be able to adjust your language to your audience and surroundings.

Personally, I think cursing is not something that makes me look good or highlights my better qualities to the people I am around. I just choose not to, and that is my personal choice. Swearing makes me look like I have no idea what I am talking about, and I look dramatic. I would rather not be seen as a dramatic student who has no filter. I would rather be viewed as respectful and respected student who can make others feel welcomed. Cursing gives people a negative view of you, the exact opposite of respect.

Swearing and making a scene in the hallway or classroom is not cool and usually doesn’t even get your point across. You look dramatic and like you don’t know any intellectual words in place of cursing.

Swearing is a personal choice, but not when you drag other people into it by screaming it through the halls or saying it right next to the teacher’s desk. It’s just not okay.

Swearing and You aren’t representing Ross or yourself highly. Change the language game for teens. Be conscious of the situations you choose to use profane language.

About the Contributor
Mariah Clemow, Arts/Entertainment & Opinion Editor

Mariah is a senior in her third year of journalism and is an editor. She's not sure what degree she wants to pursue after high school or what college to attend but she is sure about wanting to become a Young Life leader. She enjoys having fun, writing and going on silly adventures with her friends. She hopes to always continue writing, for others or just for herself.

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Opinion: Watch Your Mouth