Students Spark Dress Code Conversation at RHS

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Students Spark Dress Code Conversation at RHS

RHS student shows an example of an appropriate skirt length by demonstrating the fingertip rule.

RHS student shows an example of an appropriate skirt length by demonstrating the fingertip rule.

Emma Haun

RHS student shows an example of an appropriate skirt length by demonstrating the fingertip rule.

Emma Haun

Emma Haun

RHS student shows an example of an appropriate skirt length by demonstrating the fingertip rule.

Emma Haun, Staff Writer and Marketing Manager

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Following the Tinkers’ visit to RHS, students were encouraged to speak up about what they believe in. This sparked discussions of many things, but the most prevalent topic is the dress code. 

In a survey of 55 RHS students, 85.5% disagree with some of the current dress code policies. More than half of the complaints with the current dress code center in on the fingertip rule and the shoulder ban. 

Sophomore Tyler Hood stated, “The ripped jeans rule is kind of weird to me, it is hard to find nice ripped jeans for boys and girls that do not have rips that are the length of your arms. There are many fashion (types) that are in right now and I feel as though some of them are being shut down by the school. Sometimes a simple compliment as much as “I like your outfit.” can go a long way for someone who is having a rough day at school.”

Some students feel that the dress code policies target specific individuals. 

Senior Lauren Casaceli stated, “They are too strict towards girls’ clothing. We get detentions if we have more than two inches of our shoulders showing… We get detentions for having rips in our jeans above our fingertips even if our jeans are loose and not revealing. I agree there should be some limits on what we should wear to school but these two specifically are ridiculous.“

Luckily these complaints aren’t going unnoticed. Mrs. Emily Doblinger, Assistant Principal, has taken steps to open the floor up to students to voice their concerns with the current dress code. 

“This year I have asked students to help solve some of the issues they have with our current dress code. Students were able to communicate interest in the group through a google survey sent to all classes… My hope for this group is to debunk misinformation regarding our current dress code and to research the dress codes of other schools. Based on this information, I would like to see our students create a solution we can present to important stakeholders.” stated Doblinger

Through opening up this conversation, Doblinger hopes to create a solution not only for the students but with the students. 

“Our dress code has undergone major changes in the past 4 years. I think we hold our kids to very high standards in all areas. I’m not sure what other schools are doing, which is why I would like to empower our students to research and create a solution that will work best for Ross.” Doblinger stated. 

So, what are other high schools doing? 

Compared to Colerain High School and Fairfield High School, the dress code at RHS is rather restrictive.

In regards to holes in pants, there is nothing in the Colerain handbook that states an issue with them. The only rule about shorts and skirts is that they, “Should reach midthigh… and not be overly revealing”. 

Although Fairfield has similar rules regarding shoulders and holes in pants, their main concern, according to their websitefairfieldcityschools.com, seems to be ensuring that clothing doesn’t “…contain, promote, glorify, or refer to alcohol, drugs, tobacco, sexual innuendo or sexually suggestive contents, profane, vulgar, or lewd symbols or slogans, gangs or cults, antisocial or harassing behavior, hate, violence, death, suicide, gore, and/or blood…”

If you are interested in being a part of the dress code conversation, attend a meeting with Mrs. Doblinger on Oct. 30 from 6:45-7:15 am or 2:15-2:45 pm in the Media Center.